Why not working is dangerous thing…

When you have a yarn and knitting addiction.  I’ve been on leave from work for the last few days because my Gran unexpectedly passed away last week.  She was 91 years old and one of the most amazing women I’ve ever had the privilege of knowing.  She was born in 1922 in St. Helena California.  She lived her whole life there until she met my grandfather, a salior on leave from the US Navy.  They married quickly and she left her family to move first to New Orleans and later to Norfolk, Va.  She had two children, my mother and her brother and raised them without the support of her family and mostly on her own as is the case with most military wives.  In the early part of the 1960’s, the family returned to the Napa Valley where she was born.  I interviewed her once for a paper I wrote in college and as part of that paper I asked her if she had any regrets or any part of her life she would change.  She said that even though her life wasn’t always easy, it was a good life and she was proud of the things she had accomplished.

Growing up I never thought I had much in common with my Gran.  Times were so different at the same age for her and I.  I became a teenager in the late 1980’s and she became a teenager during the great depression of the 1930’s.  The times and technology were so different.  But the changes she saw in her lifetime…I can’t imagine.  But I learned a lot from her.  The two most important lessons, besides how to make fried chicken the Southern way, I learned from her were how to be graceful under pressure and how to knit.  My mom taught me the basics of knitting but all the tricks I learned from Gran.

 One knitting memory I will hold dear is from this last Christmas.  I looked up from my knitting to realize that there were three generations of women all knitting in my living room.  That common bond, it was awe inspiring.  But my favorite knitting/Gran memory is from a few years ago.  All of the other grandkids got handknit sweaters from Gran.  When I opened my box, I got a pattern and the yarn to go with it.  When I protested, she simply said that I knit better then she did (I’m going to call BS but you don’t argue with Gran) and that she wouldn’t knit for me any more.  It still makes me laugh out loud when I think about it.  She was always a feisty woman.

Now, I told you that story to tell you this story.  Since I’m home/doing family stuff I’ve had a lot more time to work on my knitting then I expected to.  Grace is supposed to be my vacation knitting but I’ve already completed the yoke and am several inches into the body.  I’m afraid that Grace is either going to be done or close enough to done that I wont have enough left to make it through the vacation.

Not being at work also means that I have more time to play on Ravelry. Yesterday I found Effervescence by Olga Buraya-Kefelian. Considering that I knit Gramps Cardigan in DK and am working on Grace in fingering weight, a sport weight cardi seems to make sense as my next sweater project. The pattern calls for Quince & Co in Chickadee. I haven’t used any yarn from them before but I’ve heard good things about it. So I went ahead and ordered enough to knit this.

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Picture by Quince & Co.

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6 thoughts on “Why not working is dangerous thing…

  1. Love your story about your Gran. Sorry you lost her recently. You were lucky to have her so long. I loved my grandma. She taught me to knit too. She’s been gone these many years and I miss her every day.

    • Thank you so much for your kind words about my gran. She was a lovely woman. It was always a cool feeling knitting with her and my mom. It makes you feel like you’re part of something bigger then just you.

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